Madurai

madurai-prayer-011From Kanyakumari it is a 250 km ride to Madurai. We’ve made it…barely. After over 10,000 km on the road over the past three months, our bodies are aching in places we didn’t know could ache. The two-wheeled machine which has been transporting us all this time is “exhausted” too. It experienced another “major injury” – another crack right through the middle of its chasis on the way to Madurai, but somehow we managed to pull through to our destination.
madurai-market-02madurai-market-01 Madurai is a fascinating city. My short time here would not do it any justice. However, I decided to at least have a peek at it, rather than to simply pass it by. Parts of the city are particularly photogenic. The fruit and vegetable market inside the city is as bustling and challenging to photograph as the fish market in Kollam. I came to this place every morning, I suppose more to absorb the atmosphere than to create any compelling images. Later in the mornings I’d go to the temple, the most famous temple in all of south India and arguably the finest example of Dravidian architecture – the Sri Menakshi. To my huge disappointment there was restoration work being done to the Sri Menakshi during my visit. Its giant, elaborately decorated towers were covered with faded, dry palm leaves. I was left only with post card images of what it looked like and my imagination of how it may look after the restoration.
madrurai-temple-011 Thankfully the inside of the vast temple grounds was very much intact and buzzing with religious activity. I have a strange feeling in Hindu temples; it is as if I am both – a complete alien and totally at home there. All the rituals, the hundreds queuing up for darshan (blessing) or prashad (blessed food) and bowing to the Gods carved out of stone; on the surface none of it makes much sense to someone like me. I’m not religious by any stretch of the imagination, in fact I’d say I’m anti-religious at times, but the essence behind every religion is very human and when I think of that, I, as a human being can connect with it. I feel that behind the multitude of layers, the rituals at Hindu temples or for that matter any sites of worship, stand two universal factors – misery and hope. Misery and hope go hand in hand in and around the Sri Menakshi Temple. A poor farmer’s family spends the night on the pavement by a make-shift fire, a deformed man begs for money, a newly-wed couple makes an offering and the fat businessman who has “made it” bows down to the Shiva statue – there is a degree of hope and misery that drives all of these people. They plead for a better life, money, happiness, forgiveness and they all hope that they will be heard by the divine. There isn’t an individual in the world that doesn’t suffer or hope. And as for surrendering to the divine, if it’s not God that a person looks to, it’s love, work, alcohol, drugs. The essence remains the same, only the layers around it change. Knowing this makes me feel at ease about the blanks in my knowledge of Hinduism. I can fill in those blanks. What makes me comfortable is the fact that those in the temple are humans, before they are anything else. Their actions are a manifestation of their cultural upbringing, but these actions are driven by the same misery and hope that I and every other human feel.
We spent three days in Madurai. Our next stop is Bangalore. How we have to get there is another story.

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6 Responses to “Madurai”

  1. Deb Trean Says:

    Your images are stunning of this area. The color the mood the spirituality can be felt. I agree with everything you have written and enjoy your images a great deal.

  2. Glen Goffin Says:

    Glorious images! Amazing! Such a delight to the eyes. So many stories in so many lives … and the beauty of the everyday ;D Thanks!

  3. pixelatedimage Says:

    Keep this up and I quit, Mitch. Really gorgeous stuff, as always.

  4. zara Says:

    Hi Mitcell. I miss you when you visit My Madurai. Some times i search can i see any photographers at Madurai. 2 days before i went Madurai, i saw from far distance all Koburam (Tower) was cover for Repainting r some other work. So i came back sadly. Your Madurai Photos are very beautiful man. I can feel my Madurai via your photos. I love first one. I am also waiting for to see all Photos.

  5. lakshminarayanan Says:

    Hi Mitcell
    I have seen you madurai potographs it really nice. I am bring out a coffee table book on madurai temple if you wish i can publish some of your poto in the book, if so please mail me.

  6. JOE Says:

    Hi Lakshminarayanan,
    I am from madurai. I wish to know more about your coffee table book. Can you share with me?
    – Joe

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